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Activity Overview


Figurative language is used frequently in The House of Mango Street, most notably in the chapter, "Hair". Four common forms of figurative language are metaphor, simile, personification, and hyperbole.



Type

Definition

Example

Metaphor an implied comparison between two thingsHer smile was a ray of sunshine on a dreary day.
Simile a comparison using the words "like" or "as"The thorn cut like a razor.
Personification giving human-like characteristics to non-human objectsThe wind whispered its secrets through the trees.
Hyperbole use of exaggeration to prove a pointThis traffic light is taking forever!


Find three or more examples of figurative language and, using a T-Chart, create two columns: one quoting the book with matching illustration, and the second showing the figurative language with an illustration of what it would literally look like. For example: along with “Papa’s hair is like a broom”, the cell might show Papa with actual brooms on his head.

Lesson Plan Reference

Grade Level 6-8

Difficulty Level 1 (Introducing / Reinforcing)

Type of Assignment Individual, Partner, or Group

Type of Activity: Figurative Language

Common Core Standards
  • [ELA-Literacy/L/7/5] Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings


Template and Class Instructions

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Use This Assignment With My Students", update the instructions on the Edit Tab of the assignment.)



Student Instructions

Create a storyboard that shows examples of figurative language in The House of Mango Street.


  1. Click "Start Assignment".
  2. Identify use of figurative language in the text.
  3. Put the type of figurative language (such as simile or metaphor) in the title box.
  4. Give an example from the text in the description box.
  5. Illustrate the example using using a combination of scenes, characters, and items.



Rubric

(You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)



Literal and Figurative Language
Create a storyboard that shows illustrations of the literal meaning and intended meaning of three examples of figurative language from the story.
Proficient Emerging Beginning
Examples of Figurative Language
There are three examples of figurative language in the description boxes.
There are two correct examples of figurative language in the description boxes.
Only one of the examples of figurative language is correct.
Types of Figurative Language
All three examples are correctly identified as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or personification (or other).
Two examples of figurative language are correctly identified as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or personification (or other).
Only one example of figurative language is correctly identified as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, or personification (or other).
Illustrations of Literal and Intended Meanings
Illustrations show both the literal meaning of the text and the intended meaning of the figurative language.
Illustrations show either literal meaning or intended meaning, but not both.
Illustrations do not make sense with the examples chosen.




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