How to Use a Protractor
Updated: 9/5/2018
How to Use a Protractor
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Storyboard Description

How to Use a protractor graphic organizer - diagram a process

Storyboard Text

  • Maybe I can help.
  • GAH! Math is so stupid! It doesn't make any sense!
  • This protractor thing is impossible!
  • I will show you how to use it. Well, step 1...
  • 
  • Make sure the protractor is not backwards! It makes life so much easier if you can read the numbers.
  • Before we measure, tell me if this is an acute, right, or obtuse angle.
  • It IS acute, so that means it measures less than 90 degrees. We already know the answer is between 0 and 90 degrees!
  • The line doesn't reach the numbers!
  • Acute?
  • There are two parts of the protractor to help you get the angle in the right place: 1) an upside-down T at the bottom middle 2) the base line (0 degrees or 180 degrees)
  • We want to place the protractor on top of the angle so the middle of the T is at the vertex.
  • Acute angle! 40 degrees! Take that MATH!
  • Rotate the protractor so the vertex of the angle is still at the T, but one leg of the angle is lined up with the 0 degree line.
  • That's OK. Don't you remember that definition about angles? Two RAYS with the same endpoint? Rays go on forever, so we can just extend the legs of the angle.
  • The legs of the angle are extended, so we just need to read the numbers. Our options are 140 degrees or 40 degrees. Which is it?
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