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The Odyssey Heroic Journey
Updated: 2/26/2019
The Odyssey Heroic Journey
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You can find this storyboard in the following articles and resources:

Narrative Structure

By Rebecca Ray

Literature has many forms, and each form has its own unique structure for telling a story. When studying, teaching, or learning about narration in literature, it is also important to understand its underlying arrangement. How is it created? What are the parts of a story? What aspects differ from one form to another?


The Hero’s Journey

By Rebecca Ray

Related to both plot diagram and types of literary conflict, the ”Hero’s Journey” is a recurring pattern of stages many heroes undergo over the course of their stories. Joseph Campbell, an American mythologist, writer, and lecturer, articulated this cycle after researching and reviewing numerous myths and stories from a variety of time periods and regions of the world. He found that they all share fundamental principles. This spawned the Hero’s Journey, also known as the Monomyth. The most basic version has 12 steps, while more detailed versions can have up to 17 Hero's Journey steps.


Knight

Teaching Archetypes in Literature

By Kristy Littlehale

Archetype examples are found in the world around us every day: in our speech, our beliefs, media, sports, video games, psychology, art, and even our dreams. Archetypes are universal; that is, they occur across all cultures, religions, and parts of history.


The Odyssey by Homer

Lesson Plans by Rebecca Ray

The Odyssey by Homer is an epic poem that has survived thousands of years! It is the story of Odysseus, the crafty king of Ithaca, whose Trojan Horse idea helped win the war with Troy. Following his victory in Troy, he encounters many trials that delay him from reaching his home, Ithaca, and his queen, Penelope. Odysseus' Hero's Journey is a long and arduous adventure filled with peril, temptation, and wits.


Traditional Storyboard Layout

By Anna Warfield

A storyboard is a graphic organizer that uses images to tell a story. Originally, drawings on separate pieces of paper that told a story were pinned to a board to serve as reference for animators, filmmakers, and more. Walt Disney and Howard Hughes were some of the first to use this process. The traditional storyboard is a perfect start for digital storytelling, creating graphic organizers, and helping students visually reinforce their learning.




The Odyssey

Storyboard Description

Study Odysseus Heroic Journey - Homer Odyssey | Narrative Structure Example from Literature

Storyboard Text

  • ORDINARY WORLD
  • CALL TO ADVENTURE
  • REFUSAL
  • MENTOR / HELPER
  • King Odysseus is at home, in Ithaca, with his wife, Penelope, and newborn son, Telemachus.
  • CROSSING THE THRESHOLD
  • Odysseus is called to fight the Trojans by King Menelaus.
  • TESTS / ALLIES / ENEMIES
  • He does not want to leave his family and sail to Troy; he knows it will be a long trip. He pretends to have gone mad, until Palamedes, sent to retrieve Odysseus, put Telemachus in front of Odysseus' plow. Odysseus had to reveal his sanity in order to save Telemachus.
  • APPROACH
  • Athena, the Goddess of wisdom, crafts, and war is Odysseus' guide. She wants to help Odysseus, though she has been instructed not to by Zeus. She takes pity on him while other gods forsake Odysseus, constantly saves him from death, and gives him guidance.
  • ORDEAL
  • After the war, the gods become angry with the Greeks for their prideful ways. A great storm emerges and throws them off course.
  • Odysseus is thwarted with many tests as he travels back to Ithaca.
  • Odysseus nearly makes it home, but his crew opens a bag, given to Odysseus by Aeolus, god of the winds. When the bag is opened, it releases a wind that blows them far away from Ithaca.​
  • Odysseus is sent to the underworld seeking information from the blind prophet Tiresias to guide him home. This quest brings him to the verge of death.
  • REWARD
  • ROAD BACK
  • ATONEMENT
  • RETURN
  • The King of Phaeacia gives Odysseus passage home.
  • Unlike other heroes, Odysseus was not in search of treasure. Instead, he was desperately trying to reach his home. Once he returns, he finds out that his house has been overrun with suitors trying to steal his wife and palace.
  • Instead of rushing in and killing the suitors, Odysseus is patient, wishing to learn if his wife has been faithful.
  • Odysseus, dressed as a beggar, completes a final challenge, and is restored to his rightful place.
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